Reports

We've gathered up the following content to help our community find the resources needed for living within the Broomfield Community. If you have other resources you'd like to share or need help finding content please contact us

 
 
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2015 Colorado self-sufficiency standard

This report presents and analyzes The Self-Sufficiency Standard for Colorado in 2015. This measure calculates how much income a family must earn to meet basic needs, with the amount varying by family composition and where they live. The Standard presented here is a tool that can be used in a variety of ways—by clients of workforce and training programs seeking paths to self-sufficiency, by program managers to evaluate program effectiveness, and by policymakers and legislators seeking to create programs and pathways that lead to self- sufficiency for working families. 

 

The state of the nation's housing 2016

With household growth finally picking up, housing should help boost the economy. Although homeownership rates are still falling, the bottom may be in sight as the lingering effects of the housing crash continue to dissipate. Meanwhile, rental demand is driving the housing recovery, and tight markets have added to already pressing affordability challenges. Local governments are working to develop new revenue sources to expand the affordable housing supply, but without greater federal assistance, these efforts will fall far short of need. 

 
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Out of Reach 2017

NLIHC’s annual report, Out of Reach, documents the gap between renters’ wages and the cost of rental housing.  The report’s Housing Wage is the hourly wage a full-time worker must earn to afford a modest and safe rental home without spending more than 30% of his or her income on housing costs. It is based on HUD’s Fair Market Rent (FMR), which is an estimate of what a family moving today can expect to pay for a modest rental home in the area. This year’s Housing Wage clearly indicates that housing costs are too high for low-wage workers.